Sunday, October 25, 2015

Tai Chi: An Overview (part 1 of 2)

If you translate Tai Chi (Taiji), it would mean “Supreme Ultimate Force”. It is somewhat a state of infinite and absolute potentiality. It tackles on the concept between yin and yang or the Two Aspects governing the Four Realms and Five Elements. Using those very important aspects, the world is created. Tai Chi also means “unity, one, or being able to attain oneness.”

With the use of the concept of the positive and negative energy, Tai Chi is a form of force that can be assumed as a dual dynamic state in which force coming from within the body is used in means of achieving the supreme and ultimate discipline in oneself.

Today, Tai Chi is practiced in many parts of the world including the Western World. It can be a sort of moving meditation and yoga combined. Tai Chi has its many forms or sets that consist of a number of sequential movements that was derived from martial arts that can be in the form of imitating the movements of different kinds of birds and animals in the most gentle and invigorating way. Even if it is a kind of movement involving martial arts, Tai Chi is done in a soft and graceful manner entailing smooth transitions in between.

Practitioners see Tai Chi as a form of meditative interaction between the mind, body, soul and the environment. They don’t see it as a martial art technique but as an exercise to calm the body. Some consider Tai Chi as a combat interest because of its considerable force.

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