Sunday, October 25, 2015

Tai Chi: An Overview (part 2 of 2)

With regards to Chinese medicine and philosophy, the existence of “chi” is important to the vitality that enables to animate the body. One of the many aims of Tai Chi is to promote circulation of the “chi” throughout the body. By promoting this belief, the vitality and health of a person is normally enhanced. Once the “chi” circulates around the body, it goes to the pattern of the vascular and nervous system and any organ correlated to it. Thus, making Tai Chi connected with the principles of oriental healing and acupuncture.

One of the most familiar aims of Tai Chi is fostering the calmness and tranquility of the mind. One’s mind must be focused on executing the exercise precisely because doing it in a proper manner provides an avenue to learn things about balance, motor control, alignment, movement rhythm, and the list goes on. If the person practicing Tai Chi can practice it every day, then he or she will reach to the extent of being able to stand, run, move, and walk in a better position. It also touches some of the spheres in a person’s life as well.

There are numerous benefits seen by practitioners regarding Tai Chi. One of which is inhibiting the correct posture and alignment of the body which lessens further injuries and tension.
Push-hands is a kind of Tai Chi that involves two persons. Here, principles regarding Tai Chi are applied in a manner that the response of the other person is developed in a more sensitive way. It is an opportunity to exhibit martial arts aspects in a kind of a slow motion combat, without hurting the opponent.

An emphasis that Tai Chi has channeled through its practitioners is that they can give out an energy that may be in a form of a destructive behavior or context without dissipating that energy in a harmful way.

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